BIO 122 - Online Video Resources for Biology
Last updated 10:50 P.M., 23 April 2013

Explanation
:

Many concepts in biology are best told through videos - including movie clips of organisms taken in habit view or microscopically, animations, and presentations.  Several publically-accessible websites host videos uploaded by contributors throughout the world.  Two of the dominant video hosting services include YouTube (created in 2005) and Vimeo (created in 2004).  Together, their holdings include thousands of videos pertaining to organismal biology.  Those videos have considerable instructional value to students and adults.

This page contains links to publically-accessible videos pertaining to topics covered in BIO 122 - Principles of Modern Biology at Wilkes University.  Each video was nominated by a student - and is accompanied by a 40-50 word description prepared by the student.  The videos are categorized according to topics covered in BIO 122.

This page was initiated in March 2012.  It will grow and evolve over time.

Please report any broken links or inaccurate information to the contact below.


Topic:

Issues in basic and applied biology
Macroevolution
Ecology of populations
Ecology of communities, ecosystems and landscapes
Global ecology
Classification of biological diversity
Conservation of biological diversity
Archaea
Bacteria
Protistans (amoebas, ciliates, dinoflagellates)
Red algae
(none yet nominated)

Diatoms
Brown algae
Water molds
Green algae
Land plants
Bryophytes
Seedless vascular plants
Seed plants
Conifers
Flowering plants
Fungi
Lower fungi (bread molds and chytrids)

Pilobolus: The fastest living thing on the planet (5:08) -  This video shows the zygomycete Pilobolus in action, and explains why they need to be "the fastest living thing on earth." The life cycle of Pilobolus begins with a black sporangium that has been discharged into grass. The Pilobolus  sporangium can pull 20,000 G. Astronauts have to cope with about 4G; anything past about 5G and people pass out. At normal speed they seem to just vanish; it's invisible to our eyes; so fast it's like us being catapulted to 100 times the speed of sound. With the use high speed cameras, we now can see these fungi. - Mary Margaret Corcoran (4 April 2013).

Ascomycetes
Basidiomycetes
Fungal mutualists (lichens and mycorrhizae)
General animal taxa
Sponges
Cnidarians
Flatworms
Roundworms
Molluscs
Annelids
Arthropods
Echinoderms
Chordates
Invertebrate chordates (tunicates and lancelets)
Jawless fish
Cartilaginous fish
Bony fish
Amphibians
Reptiles
Homeotherms
Birds
Mammals
Tissue types
Fetal pig dissection
Digestive system
Respiratory system
Circulatory system
Excretory system
Nervous system
Reproductive system
Immune system
Skin and hair
Musculoskeletal system
Animal development
Other disorders
Other interesting videos

This page posted and maintained by Kenneth M. Klemow, Ph.D., Biology Department, Wilkes University, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18766. (570) 408-4758, kklemow@wilkes.edu.